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Winter 2021 Class Schedule

Winter 2021 class Schedule

Course Title Instructor Day/Time
ENVR_POL 340 Global Environments and World History Tilley TBD
ENVR_POL 390-21 Climate Change, Law and Policy Burns TTH
ENVR_POL 390-23 Special Topics: Maple Syrup and Climate Change Suzukovich TBD

ENVR_POL 390-24

Special Topics: TBD Rosenzweig TBD
ENVR_POL 390-25 Special Topics in American Art: The Visual Language of Protest in Winter Zorach TBD
ENVR_POL 390-26 Archaeology of the Future Logan TBD

 

Winter 2020 course descriptions

ENVR_POL 340: Global Environments and World History

Environmental problems have today become part and parcel of popular consciousness: resources are being depleted at a record pace, human population levels just crossed the seven billion threshold, extreme poverty defines the majority of people's daily lives, toxic contaminants affect all ecosystems, increasing numbers of species face extinction, consumerism and the commodification of nature show no signs of abating, and weapons and energy systems continue to proliferate that risk the planet's viability. This introductory lecture course is designed to help students understand the relatively recent origins of many of these problems, focusing especially on the last one hundred and fifty years. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the environmental effects of urbanization, industrialization, population growth, market economies, empire-building, intercontinental warfare, energy extraction, and new technologies. They will also explore different environmental philosophies and analytic frameworks that help us make sense of historical change, including political ecology, environmental history, science studies, and world history. Finally, the course will examine a range of transnational organizations, social movements, and state policies that have attempted to address and resolve environmental problems.

ENVR_POL 390-21 Special Topics: Climate Change, Law and Policy

Description coming soon


ENVR_POL 390-23 Special Topics: Maple Syrup and Climate Change

Sesipâskw’pêskân is the Nehiywa (Cree) word for a maple sugar camp. It’s the time in between late winter and early spring when families gather to collect maple sap, and to harvest fish, beavers, and early spring plants, or at least it used to be. As the earth’s climate changes, maple trees and the subsequent maple syrup industry in the U.S. and Canada are being affected, in both good and bad ways. To compound this, the demand for maple syrup is rising in Asia. The class will cover these effects, their impact on Native American and non-Native communities, the maple syrup industry, and maple species themselves. 

ENVR_POL 390-24 Special Topics: Archaeologies of Sustainability and Collapse

Description coming soon

ENVR_POL 390-25 Special Topics in American Art: The Visual Language of Protest in Winter

Description coming soon

 

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